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Global child poverty and well-being
Measurement, concepts, policy and action

Author/Editor(s):
Alberto Minujin, Shailen Nandy
Format:
Paperback, 624 pages, 234 x 156 mm
Other formats available
ISBN
9781847424815
Published:
29 Feb 2012
Series:
Studies in Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion series

£23.19 - List price: £28.99 You save: £5.80

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North America customers can order this book here from the University of Chicago Press.

"This is an engaging, comprehensive, thoughtful, and thorough collection of evidence, ideas and expertise. It is indispensable in its pooled knowledge and picture of the possibilities for a world able to better tackle the suffering caused needlessly by the persistence of child poverty."
Poverty and Public Policy
"This substantial volume - 23 chapters - brings together most of the key authors in the field of global childhood poverty research and mulitidimensional management."
Laura Camfield, International Migration Review
"This is an important and ground-breaking study of an issue which should be of serious concern to every human being on the planet. Alberto Minujin & Shailen Nandy's text needs to be widely and closely read."
Lord Puttnam, CBE.
"This important book provides a comprehensive and damning indictment of the extent of child poverty across the globe, in rich countries as well as poor. Yet as, argued here, child poverty could be radically reduced and eventually eliminated through appropriate and feasible policies. This book should be read by policy-makers world-wide. "
Frances Stewart, Professor Emeritus, University of Oxford

About This Book

Child poverty is a central and present part of global life, with hundreds of millions of children around the world enduring tremendous suffering and deprivation of their most basic needs. Despite its long history, research on poverty and development has only relatively recently examined the issue of child poverty as a distinct topic of concern. This book brings together theoretical, methodological and policy-relevant contributions by leading researchers on international child poverty. With a preface from Sir Richard Jolly, Former Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations, it examines how child poverty and well-being are now conceptualized, defined and measured, and presents regional and national level portraits of child poverty around the world, in rich, middle income and poor countries. The book's ultimate objective is to promote and influence policy, action and the research agenda to address one of the world's great ongoing tragedies: child poverty, marginalization and inequality.

Author Biography

Born in Argentina, Alberto Minujin is professor at The New School University, New York, researching and teaching about child poverty reduction and equity, human rights, monitoring and evaluation, and social research methods. He is director of the Equity for Children Program and Website. A UNICEF Senior Officer from 1990-2005 with expertise in North and South America, Africa, Europe and the Middle East, Minujin is a mathematician with training in Applied Statistics and Demography. Shailen Nandy is Research Associate in the School for Policy Studies at the University of Bristol, UK. A co-author of Child poverty in the developing world (with David Gordon, Christina Pantazis, Simon A. Pemberton and Peter Townsend; The Policy Press, 2003), he has undertaken research for UNICEF, the World Health Organization and the UK Department for International Development. He is currently working on the ESRC-funded research project Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK (www.poverty.ac.uk).

Contents

Foreword: Unicef, children and child poverty ~ Sir Richard Jolly
Part 1: Framing the debate Introduction ~ Shailen Nandy and Alberto Minujin
Child rights, child survival and child poverty: the debate ~ Simon Pemberton, David Gordon and Shailen Nandy
Equity begins with children ~ Jan Vandemoortele
Part 2: Measurement and methodologies Measuring child poverty and deprivation ~ David Gordon and Shailen Nandy
Beyond headcount: measures that reflect the breadth and components of child poverty ~ Sabina Alkire and Jose Manuel Roche
Defining child poverty in South Africa using the socially perceived necessities approach ~ Helen Barnes and Gemma Wright
Child well-being in the US: a proposal for the development of a 'Tot's Index' using the Human Development conceptual framework ~ Sarah Burd-Sharps, Patrick Guyer, Ted Lechterman and Kirsten Lewis
A snapshot of child well-being in transition countries: exploring new methods for monitoring child well-being ~ Petra Hoelscher, Dominic Richardson and Jonathan Bradshaw
Enhancing the fight against child poverty in the European Union: an EU benchmarking exercise ~ Isabelle Engsted-Maquet
Assessing child well-being in developing countries: making policies work for children ~ Shirley Gatenio-Gabel and Sheila Kamerman
Part 3: Multidimensional child poverty in Tanzania ~ Alberto Minujin and Enrique Delamonica
Multidimensional child poverty in Congo Brazzaville ~ Geranda Notten, Chris de Neurbourg, Bethuel Makosso and Alain Beltran Mpoue
Multidimensional poverty in Vietnam ~ Keetit Roelen and Fanziska Gassman
Multidimensional deprivation among children in Iran ~ Sepideh Yousefzadeh Faal Deghati, Andrés Mideros Mora, and Chris de Neubourg
Multidimensional child poverty in Haiti ~ David Gordon, Audrey Lenoel and Shailen Nandy
Multidimensional child poverty in Latin America ~ Ernesto Espinola and María Nieves Rico
Changes in child poverty and deprivation in Sub Saharan Africa and South Asia at the end of the 20th century ~ Shailen Nandy
Part 4: Evidence base implications for policy Utopia calling: Eradicating child poverty in the United Kingdom and beyond ~ Ruth Levitas
Continuity and change in poor children's lives: evidence from Young Lives ~ Jo Boyden, Abby Hardgrove and Caroline Knowles
Policy implications of multidimensional poverty measurement in Morocco ~ Hicham Ait Mansour
Making policies work for children living in poverty: reflections from the Global Study on Child Poverty and Disparities ~ Gaspa Fajth, Sharmila Kurukulasuriya and Solrun Engilbertsdottir
Investment in social security: a possible UN model for child benefit ~ Peter Townsend
Conclusions ~ Shailen Nandy and Alberto Minujin.


 

ReviewsOwn it? Review it!

Global child poverty and well-being
Child poverty is an important area of concern for most countries in the world. Children form the foundation of any society and a society that neglects its children is unlikely to sustain any levels of development or affluence it has reached. Therefore, the conceptual issues related to accurate measurement and nature of child poverty have been dominant particularly in Western European democracies. However, in the developing world child poverty is less studied and insufficiently understood. In this context the book makes a substantial contribution to understanding child poverty. ,,The book comprises of twenty –three chapters in various countries of the world that vary geographically, politically, economically and social diverse countries and tries to arrive at a common understanding. The authors largely seek a departure from understanding poverty merely in terms of US$ 1.25 a day. It should be defined in relation to the Child Rights Convention (1989) which emphasised understanding poverty in relation to human rights or in terms of indicators which measure key deprivations of such as lack of food and nutrition, clothing and shelter, education and schooling, access to health, perhaps above all of nurture and care. ,,One of the important alternative approaches to study child poverty is the Bristol Approach or Asset Ownership based Wealth Index or Multi-dimensional Poverty Index. The socially perceived necessities approach which views poverty as enforced concept based on the parameters set by the society rather than what people consider as being important for their own well-being. Interestingly enough children’s perspectives are also elicited on their view of standard of living. Wealth alone is an inadequate measure to understand child poverty Tots Index is considered more appropriate in the United States of America which still records highest levels of child poverty in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Multi-dimensional indexes of child well-being, poverty and deprivation have been developed in Central and Eastern Europe, Commonwealth of Independent states and the European Union. These measurement strategies have implications for available data sets and also policy interventions. ,,The Bristol Approach has found relevance in Tanzania and Congo Brazzaville whereas in Vietnam detailed analysis of indicators on rural and urban, region and interestingly ethnicity have yielded greater results. One of the most noteworthy countries is Iran, where authors have developed index of multidimensional poverty comprising of provision, participation and protection. Young Lives Project cutting across three continents reiterates the point that economic growth does not translate to well-being. ,,
Reviewed by Dr Keerty Nakray
05

Global child poverty and well-being
Child poverty is an important area of concern for most countries in the world. Children form the foundation of any society and a society that neglects its children is unlikely to sustain any levels of development or affluence it has reached. Therefore, the conceptual issues related to accurate measurement and nature of child poverty have been dominant particularly in Western European democracies. However, in the developing world child poverty is less studied and insufficiently understood. In that context this book makes a substantial contribution to the understanding of child poverty. ,,The book comprises of twenty three chapters from various countries of the world that vary geographically, politically, economically and have a wide social diversity and tries to arrive at a common awareness. The authors largely seek a departure from understanding poverty merely in terms of US$ 1.25 a day. They suggest that it should be defined in relation to the Child Rights Convention (1989) which emphasised understanding poverty in relation to human rights or in terms of indicators which measure key deprivations of such as lack of food and nutrition, clothing and shelter, education and schooling, access to health, perhaps above all of nurture and care. ,,One of the important alternative approaches to the study of child poverty is the Bristol Approach or Asset Ownership based Wealth Index or Multi-dimensional Poverty Index. This socially perceived necessities approach views the extent of poverty as an enforced concept based on the parameters set by the society rather than what people consider as being important for their own well-being. Interestingly enough children’s perspectives are also elicited on their view of a standard of living. Wealth alone is an inadequate measure to understand child poverty. Tots Index is considered more appropriate in the United States of America which still records highest levels of child poverty in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Multi-dimensional indexes of child well-being, poverty and deprivation have been developed in Central and Eastern Europe, Commonwealth of Independent states and the European Union. These measurement strategies have implications for available data sets and also policy interventions. ,,The Bristol Approach has found relevance in Tanzania and Congo Brazzaville whereas in Vietnam detailed analysis of indicators on rural and urban, region and interestingly ethnicity have yielded greater results. One of the most noteworthy countries is Iran where a nationally representative survey on household income and expenditure is that of multi-dimensional poverty encompassing three dimensions on provision, participation and protection. Young Lives Project cutting across three continents reiterates the point that economic growth does not translate to well-being. Each of the chapters deals with enriching perspectives on understanding and measuring poverty. ,
Reviewed by Dr Keerty Nakray
05

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