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Ethnicity, class and aspiration
Understanding London's new East End

Author/Editor(s):
Tim Butler, Chris Hamnett
Format:
Paperback, 280 pages, 234 x 156 mm
Other formats available
ISBN
9781847426505
Published:
16 Feb 2011

£19.19 - List price: £23.99 You save: £4.80

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Own this title? Review it!

North America customers can order this book here from the University of Chicago Press.

“The book is thought provoking, informative and should generate some much needed debate about the complex issues it raises, amongst social scientists, educationists and hopefully policy-makers too.” – Journal of Education Policy
"Tim Butler and Chris Hamnett have produced a compelling analysis of the importance of aspirations and education in understanding social class and ethnicity in contemporary Britain. This thought-provoking book is a 'must-read' for all those concerned to make better sense of social change in society."
Diane Reay, Professor of Education, University of Cambridge
"This book provides a valuable and original contribution to the existing literature by containing a wealth of new empirical material on London's changing social composition, especially in relation to education. "
Paul Watt, Birkbeck, University of London
"With its focus on the social geography, education and economics of London's East End this book offers a unique and invaluable account of 'the local' within a global city over a 40-year period."
Stephen J Ball, Karl Mannheim Professor of Sociology of Education, Institute of Education University of London

About This Book

East London has undergone dramatic changes over the last 30 years, primarily as a result of London's large scale de-industrialisation and the rise in its financial sector. Large parts of inner East London remain deprived, but a once overwhelmingly white working class area is now home to a more complex and mobile class and ethnic mix. This topical book focuses on the aspirations of these different groups and the strategies they have pursued about where to live, driven in part by a concern to ensure a good education for their children. The book will be essential reading for students and academics in sociology, urban studies, geography and multicultural studies.

Author Biography

Tim Butler is Professor of Geography at King's College London. He is the author of several books on the gentrification of London and also on the regeneration of East London as well as jointly authored book on Understanding Social Inequality. He is now embarking on a comparative study of the middle classes in London and Paris. He is currently the Vincent Wright visiting professor at Sciences Po in Paris. Chris Hamnett is Professor of Geography at King's College London. He is the author of Winners and Losers: Home Ownership in Britain (1999),Unequal City: London in the Global Arena (2003) and other books.

Contents

Introduction
The changing economy and social structure of London and history of East London
Ethnic minorities and housing and perceptions of decline
Ethnicity, segregation and education: aspirations and attainment
The fallacy of choice: the difficulties in making decisions under conditions of limited choice
Reputation and working the system
Conclusions.


 

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